We can change how organisations make decisions about data

We’re developing practical guidance to help organisations adopt open, collective decision making

We are learning from and applying existing experience in public participation to data decisions

Involve is the UK’s leading public participation charity. They develop, support and campaign for new ways to involve people in decisions that affect their lives.

They maintain a comprehensive catalog of different public participation methods along with their costs, strengths and weaknesses.

We’re helping organisations pick appropriate approaches

Techniques that work in one situation or for one kind of organisation might not work for another – it depends on…

Existing
governance

Existing
community

Available
resources

Required
expertise

Decision
granularity

Development
phase

We’re cultivating a community of tech workers who use participatory approaches

Running collective decision-making processes will be an essential skill on any team

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For the Integrity Institute, the label “integrity worker” applies to a broad swath of employees working on safety. Their site reads, “If you have experience tackling any of these things on behalf of a social network, you’re probably an integrity worker.” They go on to list ethical design, hate speech, disinformation, toxicity, spam, and more than a dozen other areas.

We’re running pilots and developing case studies

We are developing an evidence base to learn from experience and inspire organisations to change their practices

In 2020, the Wellcome Trust commissioned OTT Consulting to recommend the best approach for enabling public engagement communities to share and gather evidence on public engagement practice globally, and in particular to assess the suitability of an approach adapted from the UK ‘What Works Centres’. This report is the output from that commission. It draws from a desk-based literature review, workshops in India, Peru and the UK, and a series of stakeholder interviews with international organisations.

The key themes that emerged from stakeholder interviews and workshops were that, in order for evidence about public engagement to help inform and shape public engagement practice, and for public engagement to be used and deployed effectively, there has to be an approach that can: understand the audiences, broaden out how ‘evidence’ is understood and generated, think strategically about how evidence affects and informs practice and understand the complexity of the system dynamics within which public engagement (and evidence about public engagement) operates.